MHAMD

Bipolar Disorder

Bipolar Disorder

According to the National Institute on Mental Health (NIMH) – Bipolar disorder is a serious brain illness.  Children with bipolar disorder go through unusual mood changes.  Sometimes they feel very happy or “up,” and are much more active than usual. This is called mania.  And sometimes children with bipolar disorder feel very sad and “down” and are much less active than usual. This is called depression.

Bipolar disorder is not the same as the normal ups and downs every kid goes through.  Bipolar symptoms are more powerful than that.  The illness can make it hard for a child to do well in school or get along with friends and family members. The illness can also be dangerous. Some young people with bipolar disorder try to hurt themselves or attempt suicide.

What are the symptoms of Bipolar Disorder?

Bipolar mood changes are called “mood episodes.” Your child may have manic episodes, depressive episodes, or “mixed” episodes. A mixed episode has both manic and depressive symptoms. Children and teens with bipolar disorder may have more mixed episodes than adults with the illness.

Mood episodes last a week or two – sometimes longer. During an episode, the symptoms last every day for most of the day.

Mood episodes are intense. The feelings are strong and happen along with extreme change in behavior and energy levels.

Children and teens having a manic episode may:

  • Feel very happy or act silly in a way that’s unusual
  • Have a very short temper
  • Talk really fast about a lot of different things
  • Have trouble sleeping but not feel tired
  • Have trouble staying focused
  • Talk and think about sex more often
  • increased sexual interest and activity
  • Do risky things

Children and teens having a depressive episode may:

  • Feel very sad
  • Complain about pain a lot, like stomachaches and headaches
  • Sleep too little or too much
  • Feel guilty and worthless
  • Eat too little or too much
  • Have little energy and no interest in fun activities
  • Think about death or suicide

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